Boto Python Amazon EC2

Amazon web services API for python, Boto 2.6.0, 2.9.5 and 2.9.6 for Python 2.7

 First, a sample boto python 2.7 script tested on Dreamhost with their installed boto 2.6 as well as boto 2.9.5 and 2.9.6 on Heroku. The Amazon keys are imported from our custom made cred2 module, which you will make yourself for your keys.

#!/usr/bin/python

import boto.ec2
import cred2

conn = boto.ec2.connect_to_region("us-east-1", \
    aws_access_key_id=cred2.awsaki(), aws_secret_access_key=cred2.awssak() )

# conn.start_instances('i-59999x2x')

reservations = conn.get_all_instances()
print reservations
for res in reservations:
  for isx in res.instances:
    print isx

 

substitute what the python 2.7 functions return with your keys

Your amazon keys can be found in your Amazon Web Services account

#!/usr/bin/python

def awsaki():
  return 'AKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX'

def awssak():
  return 'vvv999ccc888xxx777zzz666lll555kkk444z/'

We used awsaki which means Amazon Web Services Access Key ID or A.W.S.A.K.I. which is the best terminology to use in search engines to find information on digging this out of your account

Google this

Amazon Web Services Access Key ID

We used awssak which means Amazon Web Services Secret Access Key or A.W.S.S.A.K. which is good terminology to use in search engines to find information on digging this out of your account

Google this

Amazon Web Services Secret Access Key

 

Python 2.7 script to start an AWS instance that is stopped

#!/usr/bin/python

import boto.ec2
import cred2

conn = boto.ec2.connect_to_region("us-east-1", \
    aws_access_key_id=cred2.awsaki(), aws_secret_access_key=cred2.awssak() )

reservations = conn.get_all_instances()
rsx = reservations[0]
hsx = rsx.instances[0].start()

This works great if you have an AWS account with one instance, which is the one you want to start. So we aren’t creating an instance here, we are just starting an instance that has been stopped.

 

Now a minimal example in flask to pass boto results to the jinja template rendering modules

@app.route('/aws')
def awshm():
 x = zzcode.botoclass(); cvx = x.botofunc()
 return render_template('aws.html',navigation=navfunc(), contentVar=cvx )

 

Here we use boto in the class

class botoclass:
 def botofunc(self):
  import boto.ec2
  import credec2
  conn = boto.ec2.connect_to_region("us-east-1", \
    aws_access_key_id=credec2.awsaki(), aws_secret_access_key=credec2.awssak())
  reservations = conn.get_all_instances()
  cvx = list()
  for rsx in reservations:
   for isx in rsx.instances:
    cvx.append({'reservation': str(isx), 'status': str(isx.state), \
              'dns': str(isx.public_dns_name), 'ip': str(isx.ip_address) })
  return cvx

 

In the midst of a template in the templates directory named aws.html is this table

<TABLE>
<TR><TH>Reservation </TH><TH>Status </TH><TH>Domain </TH><TH>ip </TH></TR>
{% for item in contentVar %}
<TR>
 <TD>{{ item.reservation }}</TD>
 <TD>{{ item.status    }}</TD>
 <TD>{{ item.dns      }}</TD>
 <TD>{{ item.ip       }}</TD>
</TR>
{% endfor %}
              </TABLE>